Joan Christy lecture series presents “Adding Flavor to Heart Health” April 10

Cindy Chan Phillips ‘14, MS, MBA, RD, director of nutrition education for the New York Beef Council,
Cindy Chan Phillips ‘14, MS, MBA, RD, director of nutrition education for the New York Beef Council,

The Falk College nutrition program will host “Adding Flavor to Heart Health,” a culinary demonstration and tasting with Cindy Chan Phillips ‘14, MS, MBA, RD, director of nutrition education for the New York Beef Council, Monday, April 10, 2017 from 5:15 to 7:15 p.m. in the Nutrition Assessment, Consultation and Education (ACE) Center demonstration kitchen, Falk 204, as part of the Joan Christy lecture series.

“Adding Flavor to Heart Health” will discuss the role of protein in managing both weight and overall health, as well as demonstrate how to incorporate lean beef into healthy meals to meet the 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans and add flavor without superfluous sugar, salt, and fat. Recipes to be used in “Adding Flavor to Heart Health” include an easy Mexican beef cornbread muffins breakfast, and a cook once, eat twice dinner of pepper-crusted sirloin with garlic-sherry sauce and Korean-style beef and rice bowl. The event is free and open to the public, with advance registration required by contacting Donna Sparkes at 315.443.5573 or djsparke@syr.edu by April 6, 2017.

“There is no doubt about it, the consumption of beef is a very controversial topic in the U.S.,” says Tanya Horacek, Ph.D., RD, professor in the Falk College Department of Public Health, Food Studies and Nutrition. “Dietary guidelines and dietitians have been recommending that the general public reduce their intake of red meats as one way to improve health outcomes. The reality is most Americans are still eating a lot of meat and as dietitians, we need to figure out how to meet them in the middle.”

Cindy Chan Phillips is a registered dietitian, health communicator and currently the New York Beef Council director of nutrition education. She received her master of science in nutrition science from Syracuse University, her MBA in marketing in San Diego State University, and a chef certificate from Mohawk Valley Community College’s hospitality program.

Cindy has experience in both clinical and community nutrition. She was the primary dietitian of the Critical Care Unit at St. Luke’s Hospital where she provided medical nutrition therapy and nutrition education to improve the clinical outcome for critically ill patients, or patients with acute or chronic disease conditions.

“Cindy Chan Phillips, a Syracuse University alumna, has an elegant way of sharing how we can have beef in a healthy way,” Horacek adds. “Her presentation is engaging, myth busting, and shares some important information and tips for the general public and dietitians working with them.”

The Joan Christy lecture series is made possible by The Christy Food and Culture Fund, established in 2005 through the generosity of Syracuse University nutrition alumna Joan Christy ’78, G’81 to provide support for a lecture series in the nutrition program at Syracuse University.

Broadway, Ryans Receive Social Justice Awards at March 6 Program

Broadway and Ryans
Broadway and Ryans at the March 6 Social Justice Award program.

In commemoration of National Professional Social Work Month during March, the School of Social Work in Falk College presented its annual Dan and Mary Lou Rubenstein Social Justice Award program on Monday, March 6 at 6:45 p.m. in Heroy Auditorium. The event included a keynote address by Beth Broadway entitled, “Building Bridges of Understanding in a Divided Time—Challenges Facing Immigrants and Refugees, and How Our Community Can Help.”

Broadway is the president and CEO of InterFaith Works of CNY who, along with Clifford Ryans, founder, O.G.’s Against Gun Violence, were both honored that evening with 2017 Dan and Mary Lou Rubenstein Social Justice Awards for their respective demonstrated commitments to service and social justice in the Syracuse community. Presented for more than 30 years, the Rubenstein Social Justice Award is given in honor of the late professor Dan Rubenstein, a former faculty member in the School of Social Work and his late wife, Mary Lou, a former school social worker.

Broadway leads programs at InterFaith Works that use service, education, and dialogue to build bridges in a divided world and to provide comfort to frail elderly people, job opportunities to healthy seniors, refugee resettlement, chaplains in the jails, hospitals, and nursing homes, and dialogues between people of different backgrounds. She previously led the Community Wide Dialogue to End Racism and is the designer and facilitator of The Leadership Classroom that trains and equips individuals to improve city neighborhoods.

Clifford Ryans founded O.G.’s Against Gun Violence to help reduce community violence. He works tirelessly to educate young children about the perils of the violence, guns and gangs through presentations at schools, local events, and rallies. With a deep commitment and courage driven by his personal experience of losing a son to gun violence, Ryans shared his experiences as a featured panelist at the School of Social Work’s James L. Stone Annual Legislative Policy Symposium that focused on gun violence as it relates to trauma, community relations and racial justice.

National Baseball Hall of Famers headline sports dinner, symposium April 21-22

Baseball
Photo credit: Milo Stewart Jr./National Baseball Hall of Fame

As Falk College’s Department of Sport Management prepares to welcome its inaugural class of sport analytics majors this fall, it is teaming up with the National Baseball Hall of Fame to host baseball fans, sport industry professionals, researchers, alumni, and students for a special two-day event April 21-22 in Syracuse.

The Baseball Legends Night and Baseball Analytics Symposium will bring attention to growing career opportunities in sport analytics while highlighting analytics’ role as an essential business decision-making tool in sports. The events will be of special interest to baseball fans as analytics continue to transform how they watch the game. Both days will feature insider perspectives from Roberto Alomar and Ryne Sandberg. The title sponsor for these events is Key Foundation.

“Hall of Famers Roberto Alomar and Ryne Sandberg, whose playing careers intersected with the early stages of big data in baseball, will provide their insight and experiences for this lead-in to Syracuse University’s new Sport Analytics program,” says Jeff Idelson, President of the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. “As players – and for Sandberg as a major league manager – Robbie and Ryno had access to an ever-increasing arsenal of baseball information, but the application of that information remains a very human task.”

Tickets for the 2017 Baseball Legends Night on Friday, April 21 at The Oncenter are available through Ticketmaster (surcharges apply) at https://falk.syr.edu/event/baseball-legends-night-and-baseball-analytics-symposium/ or by telephone through The Oncenter at 315.435.2121 or Ticketmaster at 800.745.3000. Individual general admission tickets are $100, and a limited number of VIP tickets are available for $250. General and VIP tickets include a cash bar reception, dinner, silent auction and roundtable discussion with the Hall of Famers. The VIP ticket additionally includes a private pre-dinner VIP reception with either Alomar or Sandberg and an autographed baseball. Tables of 10 may also be purchased through Ticketmaster (surcharges apply) or the Department of Sport Management at 315.443.9881.

“We are extremely pleased to collaborate with the iconic National Baseball Hall of Fame on this one-of-a-kind event in Syracuse,” says Michael Veley, Director and Chair of Sport Management and the Rhonda S. Falk Endowed Professor of Sport Management. “No sport engages generations of fans like baseball, especially through statistics. These events also provide exceptional experiential learning opportunities for our students planning the dinner and symposium.”

The Baseball Analytics Symposium on Saturday, April 22 in Grant Auditorium on the Syracuse University campus is free and open to the public, with advance registration required (limited to the first 300 people to sign up) at https://falk.syr.edu/event/baseball-legends-night-and-baseball-analytics-symposium/. In addition to a panel discussion with Alomar and Sandberg highlighting their views on how data has changed the way the game is played, the Symposium will include presentations by sport industry professionals, academic researchers, and past and current Syracuse University students. The Symposium will feature the debut of the documentary, “Analytics: Changing the Fan Experience.”

“In addition to a weekend showcasing new and exciting career paths in sports, without a doubt it will show students that Syracuse University is the place to study sport analytics. We are exceedingly proud to partner with the National Baseball Hall of Fame in this endeavor,” says Diane Lyden Murphy, Dean, Falk College.

In May 2016, Falk College announced a bachelor of science in sport analytics to prepare students to think conceptually and analytically while applying these principles to real issues in sport organizations. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the job market for various data analyst disciplines is growing at 27 percent annually, far exceeding the national job growth average of 11 percent. The sport industry is the fifth largest economic sector in the U.S. economy, generating slightly less than $500 billion in 2014-15.

Statistics have always been an integral part of baseball. But today, the combination of evolving technologies that capture more data in new and different ways, the availability of powerful analytics tools, the use of this information by networks to enhance the viewing experience, and the rise of fantasy sports continue to transform the way the game is played, managed, and consumed. Data helps teams make advancements in player evaluation and customer engagement. Players can now consistently and methodically monitor and improve their on-field performance. Because baseball analytics can help fans more fully understand the game in ways that previously went unnoticed, it is leading to a deeper enjoyment of the game by serious fans while promoting a baseball appreciation for the casual fan.

The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum is open seven days a week year round, with the exception of Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year’s Day. From Labor Day until Memorial Day Weekend, the Museum observes daily regular hours of 9 a.m. until 5 p.m. The Museum observes summer hours of 9 a.m. until 9 p.m. from Memorial Day Weekend until the day before Labor Day. Ticket prices are $23 for adults (13 and over), $15 for seniors (65 and over) and $12 for juniors (ages 7-12) and for those holding current memberships in the VFW, Disabled American Veterans, American Legion and AMVets organizations. Members are always admitted free of charge and there is no charge for children 6 years of age or younger. This institution is an equal opportunity provider. For more information, visit baseballhall.org or call 888-HALL-OF-FAME (888-425-5633) or 607-547-7200. For more information about the April 21-22 events, contact the Department of Sport Management at spmbhof@syr.edu.

Baked Magazine’s “Veg Out” highlights BrainFeeders student organization

Photo by Lena Oliver ’19. Courtesy of Baked Magazine.

Veg Out: By connecting students with local farmers, BrainFeeders makes it easy to get your daily serving of greens

By Megan Falk ’19. Courtesy of Baked Magazine.

As the sun rises over the boundless field, drops of dew shimmer atop rows of lettuce, tomatoes, and radishes. A farmer swiftly harvests the vegetables one by one and gently places them in boxes with red and green type. Within an hour, the packages are en route to 13 different locations throughout Central New York, including Syracuse University. As they arrive, a young woman rides across the SU campus on her vintage blue bicycle and picks up her small box of vegetables from the farm, as she does every week. She piles the generous amounts of potatoes, kale, fennel, leeks, and delicata squash into her wire basket and pedals off with enough vegetables to last her the next seven days. Throughout the next two hours, 37 additional Syracuse University students and faculty will arrive to gather their share of produce.

Each Thursday, Common Thread Farm, located in Madison, New York, delivers local, organic produce to the University for members of a CSA (community supported agriculture) program. According to the United States Department of Agriculture, members of a CSA program pledge to contribute to the anticipated costs of running a farm and the farmer’s salary for the growing season, which provides a sense of financial security for the farmer. In return, members receive shares of the farm’s produce, but they run the risk of receiving poor harvest due to detrimental weather or pests.

The CSA program at Syracuse University is the product of the SU organization BrainFeeders.

In the spring of 2015, then-seniors Lindsay DeMay and Imelda Rodriguez created BrainFeeders after they realized the only way for students and faculty to buy fresh produce on campus was by taking the bus to the Central New York Regional Market. The duo then decided to partner with Common Thread and begin their own CSA pickup location at SU, which they launched in the fall of 2015. The program now boasts 40 members.

“When you hand people veggies, they go nuts,” says President Will Cecio. “They love it. This club is actually starting to make an impact on campus, trying to get people to cook more, eat healthy, eat more local and seasonal vegetables.” Throughout the nine-week program, members receive a box full of various seasonal vegetables. They choose between small boxes, which contain four to five types of vegetables and cost $150 for the nine weeks, and large boxes, holding eight to 10 kinds of vegetables for a price of $280. Felice Ramallo, secretary of BrainFeeders, says that although the prices seem steep, members may get five of each type of vegetable, which ends up being a bargain. “If you were to go to the grocery store and get this many veggies, it would be like, 50 bucks for a small box because these are organic,” she says. “In fact, this is probably less than if you were getting non-organic as well.”

Though Common Thread is not USDA certified as organic, it is recognized as organic by the Northeast Organic Farming Association of New York. Cecio explains that becoming USDA certified is often an extra expense to the farmers. Individuals who visit the farm can see they practice organic and sustainable techniques, such as using compost fertilizers or natural pesticides, he says. Besides providing fresh, naturally-grown vegetables to students, the boxes introduce the program’s members to new food and allow them to expand their cooking savvy. Participants may learn to cook healthy and tasty alternatives to classic dishes, or get creative with their ingredients—pumpkin pancakes, anyone?

“We want to increase people’s awareness in general of what they’re putting into their bodies,” says Ramallo. “Not just their health, but where it’s coming from, and who it’s impacting other than themselves.”

SPM students immersed in Los Angeles sports culture over spring break

Students in Los Angeles
The students met NBA legend Bill Walton (back row)

Eighteen Sport Management students enrolled in SPM 358 (Los Angeles Immersion) traveled to Los Angeles from March 11-18, 2017, where they met with more than 40 executives from the sport industry in seven days. One highlight was meeting NBA legend Bill Walton. The group also visited NASCAR, UCLA, LA Clippers, LA Dodgers, Monster Energy Drinks, Mandalay Baseball, LA Marathon, CAA, FOX, AEG, LA Kings, Staples Center, Stub Hub Center, Santa Anita Racetrack, Rose Bowl, Hollywood Bowl, NFL Network, and LA Coliseum, among others. SPM director Michael Veley and SPM internship placement coordinator Francesco Riverso accompanied the students on the trip.

Food Studies presents Out Here film screening March 28

Out Here screening posterTogether with a number of Syracuse University programs, Falk College’s Food Studies program presents a screening of Out Here, a documentary film about the hearts and hard work of queer farmers in the U.S., followed by a Q&A session with the filmmaker, Jonah Mossberg, Tuesday, March 28, 2017 in Heroy Auditorium from 5 to 7:30 p.m. The screening is free and open to the public.

Created by the Queer Farmer Film Project, the full-length documentary film illuminates the lives of queer farmers in the U.S. “Food Studies is excited to host Jonah Mossberg and his film Out Here,” says Elissa Johnson, Food Studies internship coordinator. “Although Out Here focuses on gender and sexual identity, this project ultimately highlights the intersectional identities of farmers in the U.S., and examines the important connections between food, identity, and community.”

“As a rapidly emerging field of study, Falk College’s Food Studies program explores food and its vital influence on culture, public health, the environment, and beyond,” says Diane Lyden Murphy, dean of Falk College. “Together with a number of Syracuse University groups, Falk College Food Studies is pleased to present a screening of Out Here, which brings awareness to and understanding of the lives of the United States’ queer farmers.”

This documentary film screening is presented by Falk College’s Food Studies program; Maxwell School’s Department of Sociology and Department of Anthropology; the College of Arts & Sciences’ Department of Women’s and Gender Studies and the Lesbian Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Studies program; the Syracuse University Humanities Center; and Brain Feeders, a student organization in Falk College’s Food Studies program.

For more information about the March 28 Out Here screening, contact Elissa Johnson at ejohns07@syr.edu.

Falk student leads summer camp for children of parents with cancer

Discouraged, frightened, alone. These feelings are an everyday reality for children of parents with cancer. Sometimes what they need most is a friend who understands. Camp Kesem aims to be that friend. Founded in 2000, the national organization includes 86 chapters of student-run summer camps across the U.S. that support children facing parental diagnosis and parental loss due to cancer. It provides a one-week camp experience and a year-round support network of peers fighting the same battle. Syracuse University’s chapter was founded in 2012.

This year, 19 campers experienced Camp Kesem at Syracuse University, thanks to the efforts of approximately 25 student volunteers, including child and family studies major Anna Olson ’19.

“I wholeheartedly understand how it feels to have a family member undergoing treatment,” says Olson. Her mother is a breast cancer survivor, diagnosed when Olson was sixteen. This trying experience is what motivated Olson to pursue a career as a child life specialist. “I chose this path in life to help families like mine and children like me to deal with the hardships of having a sick family member or being sick themselves,” she explains.

As co-directors of Camp Kesem at Syracuse University, Olson and Abigail Hamilton ‘19, marketing and political science dual major, oversee an executive board of student volunteers. “Anna and her student team organize this week-long summer camp, which includes obtaining medical professionals, training counselors, obtaining donations, and camper recruitment,” said Camp Kesem at Syracuse University faculty advisor Colleen Cameron, CCLS, M.Ed., a professor of practice in Falk College’s Department of Human Development and Family Science. “It is quite an accomplishment—Anna took this task on as a freshman.”

Together, Olson and her team create an incredible week for the campers, including messy games, a major food fight and paint war, “a Camp Kesem staple,” Olson says. “It is definitely the most fun part of camp.” Cancer can make a child grow up fast, she says, but at camp, they get to just be kids, surrounded by others who fully understand the struggles they are going through.

Olson explains that her responsibilities as co-director have taught her how to work with different personalities, communicate effectively and sensitively, and also ensure that every voice in the group is heard. “Most importantly, co-directing has made me even more dedicated to my major and what I am headed towards in the future,” she says.

“At the end of the day,” she adds, “I just look at my fellow classmates that I work with, who I now consider my family; and I look at pictures of the smiling faces on all our beautiful and inspiring campers, and I just feel so incredibly blessed and grateful to be a part of this organization.”

Camp Kesem is one of the 2017 Orange Circle Award recipients, which recognize exceptional philanthropic work through financial contribution or volunteerism. Camp Kesem is currently recruiting Syracuse University student volunteers for next year’s camp. Interested students may visit campkesem.org/syracuse or contact syracuse.volunteer@campkesem.org for more information on how to get involved.

Remembering Syracuse University School of Nursing alumnae and faculty

Buschle (left) with the late Alice Reynolds ‘60, professor emerita of nursing who served in the U.S. Army Nursing Corps in London during World War II.
Buschle (left) with the late Alice Reynolds ‘60, professor emerita of nursing who served in the U.S. Army Nursing Corps in London during World War II.

Celebrating the life of Kay Buschle, SU nursing alumna and professor emerita

Kay A. (Brown) Buschle ‘57, G’62, professor emerita of nursing, earned both her bachelor’s and master’s degrees from the Syracuse University School of Nursing, and much of her career was spent there as a professor of nursing.

Buschle was heavily involved in the SU Nursing Alumni Association and in alumni activities of neighboring SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry. “Kay was a leader in the Omicron Chapter of the Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society of Nursing for decades,” says fellow nursing alumna and colleague Dr. Eileen Lantier ’74, G’76, Ph.D. ‘92, senior associate dean of faculty, curriculum, and alumni at Falk College. “As president of the SU Nurses Alumni Association, she led the creation of a legacy to Syracuse University, The Alumni/Omicron bench can be seen and appreciated in the Orange Grove on campus.”

“She was a very friendly person who was easy to know, and we were a small group of faculty,” says colleague Dr. Barbara “Bobbi” Harris ‘61, G’90, Ph.D.’90, professor emerita of nursing and fellow SU nursing alumna.

She and Buschle remained good friends over the years. “When I had a car accident on Route 3, hit a tree, and got taken to a hospital up there, I called her and her husband to come pick me up,” she recalls.

“We were close, and we talked for an hour on the phone, which I don’t do with many people,” she laughs.

Buschle’s kindness was extended to her students, as well. “She just endeared herself to the students. She was always aware of the needs of the students and did whatever she could to help them,” says nursing alumna and professor emerita of nursing, Beverly “Bev” Martin ’48, ’59, G’70. She and Buschle both worked with the undergraduate nursing students, and even shared an office for a period of time. “She loved her work.”

Buschle spent her life in Central Square, New York, where she enjoyed boating on Oneida Lake, spending time with family, friends, and colleagues, as well as supporting SU athletics as a devoted basketball and football fan.

“She loved the university. She loved the school. She loved the students and she loved sports,” Martin adds. “She just was a wonderful, exuberant person to get to know. And I knew her for a long, long time.”

Buschle passed away in January 2017. Her relationship to Syracuse University remains part of the joyful memory of her life.


Lape and her family at her retirement party.
From left to right: Lape’s huband, Willard E. Lape, Jr., daughter Melanie (Lape) Pitts, Rosemary L. Lape ‘56, G’68, Lape’s daughter-in-law, and son Willard E. Lape III at Lape’s retirement party.

Remembering Rosemary Lape, SU nursing alumna, professor emerita

Rosemary L. Lape ‘56, G‘68, professor emerita of nursing, was both a Syracuse University alumna and faculty member. Born 1931 in Scranton, Pennsylvania, Lape received her bachelor’s and master’s degrees from the Syracuse University School of Nursing.

Lape served as an associate professor of nursing at Syracuse University for 32 years. “The most outstanding thing about [Lape] was that she was the most ethical person you would ever meet,” says fellow professor emerita of nursing Dr. Barbara “Bobbi” Harris ’61, G’90, Ph.D.’90.

Lape and her colleague, the late Julia Evelyn “Ev” Osborne ’47, ‘49, G‘67, professor emerita of nursing, each studied for one year as part of the Robert Wood Johnson Nurse Faculty Fellowship program in Rochester, New York in 1978 and 1977, respectively. With the experience gained at the fellowship, together she, Osborne, and Harris started a primary care nurse practitioner program at Syracuse University.

Lape is quoted in a 1978 article, “Nurse Practitioners Examine, Treat Patients,” saying, “I believe that primary care is the future of nursing and I want to be there.”

In the article, Dr. Ungenborg Mauksch, then-director of the Robert Wood Johnson Nurse Faculty Fellowship Program in Princeton, New Jersey said, “It is hoped that the program will increase the number of nursing schools offering primary care training to produce nurse practitioners. These specially trained nurses now represent only a small percentage of nurses, but they have shown that practicing jointly with physicians, they can assume responsibility for a major share of the patients seen in practices offering general medical services.”

In the same article, then-Syracuse University dean of nursing, Thetis Group said, “We are fortunate that Prof. Lape and Prof. Evelyn Starr Osborne will be able to work together as a team in this project.”

Lape passed away in September 2016. Her involvement at Syracuse University will be warmly remembered.


Nursing faculty Dr. Carol Brooks ‘55, Osborne, and the late Dorothy “Dottie” Mae Lott Goodwin G’61 at a celebration for Harris on receiving her Ph.D.
From left to right: Professor emerita of nursing Dr. Carol Brooks ‘55, Osborne, and the late Dorothy “Dottie” Mae Lott Goodwin G’61 at a celebration for Harris on receiving her Ph.D.

Honoring professor emerita Evelyn “Ev” Osborne, one of SU’s first nursing graduates

Born in 1926 in Syracuse, New York, Julia Evelyn “Ev” (Starr) Osborne ’47, ‘49, G’67, professor emerita of nursing, was one of the first students to enroll in the new Syracuse University School of Nursing, established in 1943 as a response to the rising demand for nurses during wartime. There, she earned her master’s degree and then served as an associate professor for 35 years.

Osborne and fellow SU professor emerita, the late Rosemary Lape ‘56, G’68, both received Robert Wood Johnson Nurse Faculty Fellowships, which took them to Rochester, New York in 1977 and 1978, respectively. The fellowship was intended to help more nursing schools offer training in clinical primary care. At this time, nurse practitioners represented just a small fraction of nurses, yet they were starting to take ownership of more and more patient responsibilities while working with physicians.

Osborne, Lape, and colleague Dr. Barbara “Bobbi” Harris ‘61, G’90, Ph.D.’90 together developed the primary care nurse practitioner program at Syracuse University.

“They did a lot for the School of Nursing,” says Harris, a professor emerita of nursing who explained they hosted health fairs at the university and other places, covering specialized topics as specialists in health assessments. “When [Osborne and Lape] came back,” she adds, “we hosted an alumni get-together in the spring, and those two were the program. They talked about their experience in learning how to do physicals and health assessments.”

For example, in 1981, Osborne and Lape presented “Physical Assessment for the Occupational Health Nurse,” an ongoing program that took place at monthly meetings of the Central New York Association of Occupational Health Nurses, focusing on neurological assessment in the fall and muscular-skeletal assessment in the spring.

During her retirement, Osborne shared her love of the arts with her grandchildren and volunteered at Sunshine Horses, a Syracuse horse rescue facility. Osborne passed away in November 2016. Her connection to Syracuse University as both student and faculty will be remembered fondly.

Broadway, Ryans to Receive Social Justice Awards at March 6 Program

Dan and Mary Lou Rubenstein
Dan and Mary Lou Rubenstein

In commemoration of National Professional Social Work Month during March, the School of Social Work in Falk College will present its annual Dan and Mary Lou Rubenstein Social Justice Award program on Monday, March 6 at 6:45 p.m. in Heroy Auditorium. The event is free and open to the public, and will include a keynote address by Beth Broadway entitled, “Building Bridges of Understanding in a Divided Time—Challenges Facing Immigrants and Refugees, and How Our Community Can Help.”

Broadway is the president and CEO of InterFaith Works of CNY who, along with Clifford Ryans, founder, O.G.’s Against Gun Violence, will be honored that evening with 2017 Dan and Mary Lou Rubenstein Social Justice Awards for their respective demonstrated commitments to service and social justice in the Syracuse community. Presented for more than 30 years, the Rubenstein Social Justice Award is given in honor of the late professor Dan Rubenstein, a former faculty member in the School of Social Work and his late wife, Mary Lou, a former school social worker.

Broadway leads programs at InterFaith Works that use service, education, and dialogue to build bridges in a divided world and to provide comfort to frail elderly people, job opportunities to healthy seniors, refugee resettlement, chaplains in the jails, hospitals, and nursing homes, and dialogues between people of different backgrounds. She previously led the Community Wide Dialogue to End Racism and is the designer and facilitator of The Leadership Classroom that trains and equips individuals to improve city neighborhoods.

Clifford Ryans founded O.G.’s Against Gun Violence to help reduce community violence. He works tirelessly to educate young children about the perils of the violence, guns and gangs through presentations at schools, local events, and rallies. With a deep commitment and courage driven by his personal experience of losing a son to gun violence, Ryans shared his experiences as a featured panelist at the School of Social Work’s James L. Stone Annual Legislative Policy Symposium that focused on gun violence as it relates to trauma, community relations and racial justice.

For more information about the March 6 program, and to RSVP, please contact the School of Social Work at ljmarra@syr.edu.