Seed Grant Awards

2017-2018

Incidence of and Risk for Early Mortality among National Football League Players, 1922-Present

Principal Investigator: Brittany Kmush, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Public Health
(Co-I) Shane Sanders, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Sport Management
(Co-I) Bhavneet Walia, Ph.D., Instructor, Sport Management
(Co-I) Arthur Owora, MPH, DrPH, Assistant Professor, Public Health

This proposal will examine mortality rates among NFL players as well as determine the association of player attributes and on-field events with mortality in this cohort of 23,000 elite male athletes primarily from the United States with data collection starting in 1922.

Long-term adverse health outcomes, particularly those associated with concussions including chronic traumatic encephalopathy, depression, and mortality, are of growing concern among elite athletes, especially professional boxers and American football players. However, concussions can be difficult to diagnose and there is mounting evidence that even sub-clinical blows, especially when they occur frequently, can also lead to adverse health outcomes. Among National Football League (NFL) players, certain player attributes including playing style and position of play, along with on-field events, such as number of tackles and sacks, are likely to be strong predictors for the risk of developing adverse long-term health outcomes from repeated, yet mild, trauma.

Moderating Effects of Physiological and Socio-behavioral Characteristics on the SU Football Team Injuries and Performance: A Pilot Cohort Study

Principal Investigator: Arthur Owora, MPH, DrPH, Assistant Professor, Public Health
(Co-I) Bhavneet Walia, Ph.D., Instructor, Sport Management
(Co-I) Brittany Kmush, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Public Health
(Co-I) Shane Sanders, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Sport Management

The goal of this seed grant project is to expand our current understanding of college football-related injuries, its causes and opportunities for prevention informed by paradigms drawn from a range of disciplines, including epidemiology, biostatistics, biomechanics, ergonomics and the behavioral and social sciences. Through collaboration with the Syracuse University Football Department, this project will create research databases that will facilitate an examination of epidemiologic associations involving various physiological and socio-behavioral factors and football related injuries.

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Building Korea’s Brand Personality and Equity with the Olympic Brand and the 2018 PyeongChang Winter Olympics

Principal Investigator: Jeeyoon (Jamie) Kim, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Sport Management

Countries host the Olympics with expectations to improve the country’s brand through the games. The 2018 PyeongChang Winter Olympics is no exception, expecting $10.5 billion worth country brand improvement effect that leads to $39.8 billion worth of increase in Korean product sales and tourist visit (HRI, 2011). However, such optimistic expectation on branding effects is often criticized as ‘unreliable’, ‘romanticized’, and ‘unrealized’.

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Correlates of Longevity among Former NCAA Football Players

2017-2018 Sport and Human Development Institute Seed Grant Award

Principal Investigator: Shane Sanders, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Sport Management
(Co-I) Arthur Owora, MPH, DrPH, Assistant Professor, Public Health
(Co-I) Brittany Kmush, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Public Health
(Co-I) Bhavneet Walia, Ph.D., Instructor, Sport Management

This proposal will examine mortality rates among NFL players as well as determine the association of player attributes and on-field events with mortality in this cohort of 23,000 elite male athletes primarily from the United States with data collection starting in 1922.

Long-term adverse health outcomes, particularly those associated with concussions including chronic traumatic encephalopathy, depression, and mortality, are of growing concern among elite athletes, especially professional boxers and American football players. However, concussions can be difficult to diagnose and there is mounting evidence that even sub-clinical blows, especially when they occur frequently, can also lead to adverse health outcomes. Among National Football League (NFL) players, certain player attributes including playing style and position of play, along with on-field events, such as number of tackles and sacks, are likely to be strong predictors for the risk of developing adverse long-term health outcomes from repeated, yet mild, trauma.

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