Program Assessment Data

As a Council on Social Work Education (CSWE) accredited program, the Social Work program is required to engage in assessment of student learning outcomes. The program has designed and implemented a comprehensive assessment plan that provides data on the educational process as manifested in the attainment of educational outcomes by students. Results of the assessment are provided to the public and are used to inform curriculum change and increase programmatic effectiveness.

The assessment plan design includes student learning measurement of each of the nine social work competencies at the BSSW, MSW Generalist, Advanced Integrated Practice (AIP) and Advanced Clinical Practice (ACP) levels.

The assessment plan consists of at least two identified outcome measures, a field measure and a course-embedded measure, for each competency at each level. BSSW students are evaluated at the generalist level while 60-credit hour MSW students are evaluated at the generalist level and again at the concentration level (either AIP or ACP) MSW advanced standing students are evaluated at the concentration level.

The identified field measure is the Field Instruction Evaluation, completed by field instructors at the end of each field placement experience. The integration of students’ educational knowledge, values, skills and cognitive/affective processes are evaluated in the field environment, allowing for direct assessment of their professional behaviors and learning. A course-embedded measure (such as a test, paper or other assignment) is utilized for the second measure. The program developed nine unique course-embedded measures at the undergraduate level, nine at the MSW generalist level, nine for AIP, and nine for ACP. The course embedded measurement occurs in key required courses throughout the program.

The School has developed benchmarks for each outcome measure, as outlined in the assessment plan. The program determines the percentage of students that attained the benchmark for each outcome measure and then averages the field and course-embedded measure percentages together to obtain the percentage of students demonstrating overall competence. The program then determines whether this percentage is above or below the competency benchmark. The competency benchmark for BSSW students is eighty-five percent and for MSW students is ninety percent. To review past and current learning outcome data simply click on the provided links at the end of the page. Or use the yearly CSWE data links located under “In this Section”.

Competencies and Behaviors

Demonstrate Professional and Ethical Behavior

BSSW and MSW Foundation

Social workers understand the value base of the profession and its ethical standards, as well as relevant laws and regulations that may impact practice at the micro, mezzo, and macro levels. Social workers understand frameworks of ethical decision-making and how to apply principles of critical thinking to those frameworks in practice, research, and policy arenas. Social workers recognize personal values and the distinction between personal and professional values. They also understand how their personal experiences and affective reactions influence their professional judgment and behavior. Social workers understand the profession’s history, its mission, and the roles and responsibilities of the profession. Social Workers also understand the role of other professions when engaged in inter-professional teams. Social workers recognize the importance of life-long learning and are committed to continually updating their skills to ensure they are relevant and effective. Social workers also understand emerging forms of technology and the ethical us of technology in practice.

  • Make ethical decisions by applying the standards of the NASW Code of Ethics, relevant laws and regulations, models for ethical decision-making, ethical conduct of research, and additional codes of ethics as appropriate to context
  • Use reflection and self-regulation to manage personal values and maintain professionalism in practice situations
  • Demonstrate professional demeanor in behavior; appearance; and oral, written, & electronic communication
  • Use technology ethically and appropriately to facilitate practice outcomes
  • Use supervision and consultation to guide professional judgment and behavior
MSW Advanced Integrated Practice (AIP)

Social workers completing the AIP concentration understand how the values and ethical standards of the profession guide critical thinking and decision making that impact practice at an advanced level. Using historical, theoretical and conceptual frameworks, Social Workers understand the intersectionality of beliefs amongst individuals, families, groups, organizations and communities, and the professional role they play within that system. They recognize, engage and influence others in the importance of self-awareness, reflection and professional development to enhance practice outcomes.

  • Uphold professional ethical standards within their specialized areas of practice
  • Use purposeful reflection and insight to negotiate the direction of supervision.
  • Effectively navigate multiple levels of social work practice by engaging in varied professional roles and/or functions.
  • Demonstrate leadership in professional collaboration, service delivery team, task force or committee.
MSW Advanced Clinical Practice (ACP)

Practitioners in clinical social work recognize the importance of the therapeutic relationship, the person-in-environment and the strengths perspective, the professional use of self with clients, and the adherence to ethical guidelines of professional behavior. Clinical social workers recognize their role on inter-professional teams and the ethical use of technology in their practice.

  • Uphold professional standards within the scope of practice for clinical social workers
  • Engage in clinical supervision/consultation
  • Utilize ethical decision-making, ethical use of technology in clinical practice.
  • Engage in self-reflection to identify value conflicts, strengths, and challenges/areas for growth

Engage Diversity and Difference in Practice

BSSW and MSW Foundation

Social workers understand how diversity and difference characterize and shape the human experience and are critical to the formation of identity. The dimensions of diversity are understood as the intersectionality of multiple factors including but not limited to age, class, color, culture, disability and ability, ethnicity, gender, gender identity and expression, immigration status, marital status, political ideology, race, religion/spirituality, sex, sexual orientation, and tribal sovereign status. Social workers understand that, as a consequence of difference, a person’s life experiences may include oppression, poverty, marginalization, and alienation as well as privilege, power, and acclaim. Social workers also understand the forms and mechanisms of oppression and discrimination and recognize the extent to which a culture’s structures and values, including social, economic, political, and cultural exclusions, may oppress, marginalize, alienate, or create privilege and power.

  • Apply and communicate understanding of the importance of diversity and difference in shaping life experiences in practice at the micro, mezzo, and macro levels.
  • Present themselves as learners and engage clients and constituencies as experts of their own experience
  • Apply self-awareness and self-regulation to manage the influence of personal biases and values in working with diverse clients and constituencies.
MSW Advanced Integrated Practice (AIP)

Social workers completing the AIP concentration understand that diversity is complex and multifaceted, including but not limited to age, class, color, culture, disability and ability, ethnicity, gender, gender identity and expression, immigration status, marital status, political ideology, race, religion/spirituality, sex, sexual orientation, and tribal sovereign status. AIP requires understanding that people interact with larger institutions, such as communities, organizations, and political systems, which may both enable and constrain the expression of difference. Social workers completing the AIP concentration will be able to recognize the difference between strategies of empowerment and oppression, and promote empowerment in their work with clients and client systems. AIP also requires thorough exploration of the strengths and resources associated with a person’s diversity characteristics, and those of the communities with which they identify, as assets in facilitating meaningful change.

  • Engage in an ongoing self-assessment to mitigate the influence of personal and professional biases.
  • Integrate diverse and culturally responsive perspectives to guide practice within the context of multi-level and multi-professional systems.
  • Conceptualize and analyze how systemic oppression, discrimination, and marginalization impacts individuals and/or the communities with which they identify
MSW Advanced Clinical Practice (ACP)

Practitioners in clinical social work engage in diversity and difference by being knowledgeable about effects of the various forms of isms and discrimination. Practitioners continue to develop awareness and specialized knowledge and understanding about history, traditions, values and systems as they relate to clinical practice. Dimensions of diversity are understood as the intersectionality of multiple factors, critical to the formation of identity, and characterize and shape the human experience.

  • Engage in an ongoing self-assessment to mitigate the influence of personal biases in the therapeutic relationship
  • Articulate how wellness and illness are defined differently depending on clients’ culture and values
  • Incorporate clinical practices that are compatible with client culture and values.

Advance Human Rights and Social, Economic and Environmental Justice

BSSW and MSW Foundation

Social workers understand that every person regardless of position in society has fundamental human rights such as freedom, safety, privacy, an adequate standard of living, health care, and education. Social workers understand the global interconnections of oppression and human rights violations, and are knowledgeable about theories of human need and social justice and strategies to promote social and economic justice and human rights. Social workers understand strategies designed to eliminate oppressive structural barriers to ensure that social goods, rights, and responsibilities are distributed equitably and that civil, political, environmental, economic, social, and cultural human rights are protected.

  • Apply and demonstrate understanding of social, economic, and environmental justice to advocate for human rights at the individual and system levels
  • Engage in practices that advance social, economic, and environmental justice
  • Effectively advocate when issues of social, economic and environmental justice interfere with engagement, assessment, intervention, evaluation, access to and delivery of services
MSW Advanced Integrated Practice (AIP)

Social workers completing the AIP concentration have an advanced understanding that every person regardless of position in society has fundamental human rights such as self-determination, security, dignity, and access to the full benefits of society. They can apply their understanding of structural causes of oppression to critically examine how multiple oppressions intersect at the crossing points of people’s diverse identities, expressions, and abilities. Social workers completing the AIP concentration can use their knowledge of oppression to both develop and evaluate strategies that promote social and economic justice, and advance basic human rights.

  • Develop advocacy strategies that alleviate causes of oppression
  • Assume leadership through varied social work roles and functions that advance or protect civil, political, environmental, economic, social, and cultural human rights
MSW Advanced Clinical Practice (ACP)

Practitioners in clinical social work safeguard and enhance fundamental human rights, including freedom, safety, privacy, an adequate standard of living, and access to health care and education. They strive to eliminate oppressive structural barriers. They are aware of both local and global aspects of human rights and social justice issues, and of the ways in which the impact of economic and sociopolitical inequality, racism, sexism, and other forms of inequity and oppression undermine the emotional, mental, and physical well-being of their clients. Practitioners in clinical social work are knowledgeable about theories of human need and social justice, and integrate strategies into their practice to promote social and economic justice for client systems and communities.

  • Recognize the presence of social, economic, environmental and other forms of injustice within clinical practice.
  • Identify barriers to treatment from prejudice, oppression, privilege and power
  • Demonstrate the ability to provide leadership in advancing human rights and social, economic and environmental justice within a clinical context

Engage in Practice-informed Research and Research-informed Practice

BSSW and MSW Foundation

Social workers understand quantitative and qualitative research methods and their respective roles in advancing a science of social work and in evaluating their practice. Social workers know the principles of logic, scientific inquiry, and culturally informed and ethical approaches to building knowledge. Social workers understand that evidence that informs practice derives from multidisciplinary sources and multiple ways of knowing. They also understand the processes for translating research findings into effective practice.

  • Use and translate research evidence to inform and improve practice, policy, and service delivery.
MSW Advanced Integrated Practice (AIP)

Social workers completing the AIP concentration can access and apply quantitative and qualitative research methods in developing advanced practice approaches as well as in evaluating their practice. Social workers completing the AIP concentration have an enhanced understanding that evidence that informs practice derives from multi-disciplinary sources and multiple ways of knowing. They also understand the processes for translating research findings into effective practice.

  • Use the evidence-base of social work practice to guide intervention strategies with individuals and communities
  • Use observations from their practice to identify questions for further study
MSW Advanced Clinical Practice (ACP)

Practitioners in clinical social work understand the methodology and applicability of both quantitative and qualitative research methods in advancing the science of social work, in interpreting and applying research findings, and in evaluating their own practice. They are aware that principles of critical thinking, scientific inquiry, cultural competence, and social work ethics must be integrated into research design and the building of knowledge. They understand that evidence that informs practice derives from multi-disciplinary sources and multiple ways of knowing. The also understand the processes involved in translating research findings into effective practice.

  • Apply practice-informed research and theory to guide and improve clinical practice
  • Apply critical thinking skills in interpreting and applying theoretical concepts and research findings in clinical work with client system

Engage in Policy Practice

BSSW and MSW Foundation

Social workers understand that human rights and social justice, as well as social welfare and services, are mediated by policy and its implementation at the federal, state, and local levels. Social workers understand the history and current structures of social policies and services, the role of policy in service delivery, and the role of practice in policy development. Social workers understand their role in policy development and implementation within their practice settings at the micro, mezzo, and macro levels and they actively engage in policy practice to effect change within those settings. Social workers recognize and understand the historical, social, cultural, economic, organizational, environmental, and global influences that affect social policy. They are also knowledgeable about policy formulation, analysis, implementation, and evaluation.

  • Identify social policy at the local, state, and federal level that impacts well-being, service delivery, and access to social services
  • Assess how social welfare and economic policies impact the delivery of and access to social services
  • Apply critical thinking to analyze, formulate, and advocate for policies that advance human rights and social, economic, and environmental justice.
MSW Advanced Integrated Practice (AIP)

Social workers completing the AIP concentration have a strong understanding that rights and social justice, as well as social welfare services, are affected by policies and their implementation at the federal, state, and local levels. They are knowledgeable about current social policies and services, and the role of practice in policy development. They can articulate the complex interrelationships across policies for service delivery, and are able to play an active role the development and implementation of policy in micro, mezzo, and macro practice and settings. Social workers have an advanced understanding of how to engage in policy practice to effect change in the context of historical, social, cultural, economic, organization, environmental, and global factors. They know how to locate and interpret policy documents as part of policy formulation, analysis, implementation, and evaluation, and as part of active engagement in policy advocacy to advance human rights and social justice.

  • Take into consideration a range of economic and social factors to analyze social and organizational policies, and demonstrate the ability to convey their insights for the purpose of improving and modifying these policies to better serve vulnerable individuals
  • Participate in or lead policy assessment aimed at modifying existing policy or developing new policy at the agency, local, state, or federal level where there is impact on social work practice or delivery systems

Engage with Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations and Communities

BSSW and MSW Foundation

Social workers understand that engagement is an ongoing component of the dynamic and interactive process of social work practice with, and on behalf of, diverse individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Social workers value the importance of human relationships. Social workers understand theories of human behavior and the social environment, and critically evaluate and apply this knowledge to facilitate engagement with clients and constituencies, including individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Social workers understand strategies to engage diverse clients and constituencies to advance practice effectiveness. Social workers understand how their personal experiences and affective reactions may impact their ability to effectively engage with diverse clients and constituencies. Social workers value principles of relationship building and inter-professional collaboration to facilitate engagement with clients, constituencies, and other professionals as appropriate.

  • Apply and demonstrate knowledge of human behavior and the social environment, person-in-environment, and other multidisciplinary theoretical frameworks to engage with clients and constituencies.
  • Use empathy, reflection, and interpersonal skills to effectively engage diverse clients and constituencies.
MSW Advanced Integrated Practice (AIP)

Social workers completing the AIP concentration have an enhanced understanding that engagement with diverse people and communities is an ongoing component of social work practice. They are able to utilize the professional knowledge base of social work, critically evaluate this knowledge, and draw upon different engagement strategies that are sensitive to organizational context and cultural difference. They have a rich understanding of how their personal experiences may impact their ability to effectively engage with diverse individuals and communities. In their choice of engagement strategies and in their work with other professionals, they build upon a core foundation of social work values, such as person-centered practice, self-determination, community empowerment, and cultural humility.

  • Are able to identify and describe the conceptual basis of the engagement approach they use to work with diverse individuals and communities
  • Effectively utilize engagement skills appropriate to diverse individuals, communities, and settings in order to foster cooperative relationships
MSW Advanced Clinical Practice (ACP)

Clinical social workers understand that engagement is an ongoing component of the dynamic and interactive process of social work practice with, and on behalf of, diverse individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Clinical social workers value the importance of human relationships and understand theories of human behavior in the social environment, person-in-environment, and other multidisciplinary theoretical frameworks to engage all clients and constituencies. They critically evaluate and apply this knowledge to facilitate engagement with clients and constituencies, including individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities.

  • Utilize a bio-psycho-social-cultural-spiritual approach to engage clients in clinical practice
  • Demonstrate effective strategies for initiating and developing a therapeutic relationship
  • Identify how personal experiences and affective reactions may influence the ability to effectively engage with diverse clients.
  • Engage community resources to enhance treatment outcomes

Assess with Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations and Communities

BSSW and MSW Foundation

Social workers understand that assessment is an ongoing component of the dynamic and interactive process of social work practice with, and on behalf of, diverse individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Social workers understand theories of human behavior and the social environment, and critically evaluate and apply this knowledge in the assessment of diverse clients and constituencies, including individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Social workers understand methods of assessment with diverse clients and constituencies to advance practice effectiveness. Social workers recognize the implications of the larger practice context in the assessment process and value the importance of inter-professional collaboration in this process. Social workers understand how their personal experiences and affective reactions may affect their assessment and decision-making.

  • Collect and organize data, and apply critical thinking to interpret information from clients and constituencies.
  • Apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment, person-in-environment, and other multidisciplinary theoretical frameworks in the analysis of assessment data from clients and constituencies.
  • Develop mutually agreed-on intervention goals and objectives based on the critical assessment of strengths needs, and challenges of clients and constituencies.
  • Select appropriate intervention strategies based on the assessment, research knowledge, and values and preferences of clients and constituencies.
MSW Advanced Integrated Practice (AIP)

Social workers completing the AIP concentration understand that assessment is a key component of integrated social work practice. Social workers are able to integrate a range of tools and frameworks in conducting an assessment of individuals and communities, including the use of empowerment theory, strengths-based perspectives, DSM-5, and trauma-informed care frameworks. Social workers understand persons and social contexts as interdependent, are able to incorporate macro context in their assessments of individuals and communities, and can utilize interdisciplinary collaboration in this process.

  • Independently identify applicable assessment frameworks and tools to collect and organize data;
  • Utilize an integrated approach to collect and organize information from varied sources to develop a comprehensive assessment
  • Identify multidimensional intervention strategy based on thoroughly integrated assessment
MSW Advanced Clinical Practice (ACP)

Clinical social workers understand that assessment is a dynamic and interactive process that must be ongoing to best service diverse individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Clinical social workers, with an understanding of theories of human behavior in the social environment, critically evaluate and apply this understanding in making assessments with diverse clients and constituencies. Clinical social workers are particularly aware of their own affective reactions and personal experiences and how these may impact their assessment and decision-making.

  • Demonstrate knowledge of family systems, the DSM and other relevant frameworks for clinical assessment
  • Engage in critical thinking to interpret information from client systems
  • Demonstrate awareness of personal and professional biases that may influence clinical assessment

Intervene with Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations and Communities

BSSW and MSW Foundation

Social workers understand that intervention is an ongoing component of the dynamic and interactive process of social work practice with, and on behalf of, diverse individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Social workers are knowledgeable about evidence informed interventions to achieve the goals of clients and constituencies, including individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Social workers understand theories of human behavior and the social environment, and critically evaluate and apply this knowledge to effectively intervene with clients and constituencies. Social workers understand methods of identifying, analyzing and implementing evidence-informed interventions to achieve client and constituency goals. Social workers value the importance of interprofessional teamwork and communication in interventions, recognizing that beneficial outcomes may require interdisciplinary, interprofessional, and inter-organizational collaboration.

  • Apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment, person-in-environment, and other multidisciplinary theoretical frameworks in interventions with clients and constituencies
  • Use inter-professional collaboration as appropriate, to achieve beneficial practice outcomes
  • Negotiate, mediate, and advocate with and on behalf of diverse clients and constituencies
  • Facilitate effective transitions and endings that advance mutually agreed-on goals
MSW Advanced Integrated Practice (AIP)

Social workers completing the AIP concentration recognize that intervention is at the core of the profession. They understand that intervention is comprised of three essential components, empirically supported models of practice, organizational context, and the self-determined preferences and choices of individuals and communities. They appreciate that interventions are informed by professional expertise; whose development is ongoing and arises from social workers’ practice experiences. They understand and value intra- and inter-professional communication and organizational collaboration, and recognize these processes as essential for effective intervention.

  • Identify an appropriate empirically supported intervention for a client or client system
  • Articulate a sound rationale for the selection of interventions
  • Independently plan and implement appropriate interventions with attention to: client values and desires, organizational capacities, practitioner expertise, and professional collaboration
MSW Advanced Clinical Practice (ACP)

Practitioners in clinical social work carefully assess interventions for appropriateness for each client system. They recognize the fact that interventions need to be reassessed and may change over time. Through an understanding of human behavior in the social environment, issues of diversity, and multidisciplinary theoretical frameworks, they critically analyze evidence-informed interventions for each client system to select only those that are appropriate to that client system’s issues. They engage client systems in the decision-making process to ensure that interventions address mutually agreed-upon goals and obtain informed consent before proceeding.

  • Provide interventions that are consistent with clinical scope of practice and service delivery objective.
  • Present sound rationale for the use of treatment modalities and evidence-informed clinical intervention.
  • Develop mutually determined clinical interventions and goals based on client values and priorities, clinical assessment, and research knowledge.

Evaluate with Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations and Communities

BSSW and MSW Foundation

Social workers understand that evaluation is an ongoing component of the dynamic and interactive process of social work practice with, and on behalf of, diverse individuals, families, groups, organizations and communities. Social workers recognize the importance of evaluating processes and outcomes to advance practice, policy, and service delivery effectiveness. Social workers understand theories of human behavior and the social environment, and critically evaluate and apply this knowledge in evaluating outcomes. Social workers understand qualitative and quantitative methods for evaluating outcomes and practice effectiveness.

  • Select and use appropriate methods for evaluation of outcomes.
  • Apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment, person-in-environment, and other multidisciplinary theoretical frameworks in the evaluation of outcomes.
  • Critically analyze, monitor, and evaluate intervention and program processes and outcomes.
  • Apply evaluation findings to improve practice effectiveness at the micro, mezzo, and macro levels.
MSW Advanced Integrated Practice (AIP)

Social workers completing the AIP concentration understand the integral role of evaluation in maintaining accountability, determining practice effectiveness, and supporting clients’ rights. Integrated practice with individuals or communities is informed by systematic evaluation of consumer needs, service delivery processes, intended and unintended outcomes of intervention, and cost. Social workers completing the AIP concentration understand that all evaluation is culturally embedded and that validity requires culturally responsive evaluation.

  • Frame evaluations based upon program theory and multi-disciplinary theories of practice
  • Select information sources and data collection strategies that are culturally appropriate and relevant to the evaluation question
  • Can lead or participate in evaluation activities in multi-professional settings, which includes effectively communicating findings to multiple stakeholder audiences
MSW Advanced Clinical Practice (ACP)

Clinical social workers utilize qualitative and quantitative information coupled with various theoretical foundations to evaluate and contextualize their own practice. Clinical social work practitioners critically analyze, monitor, and evaluate process and outcomes of interventions to enhance and improve best practice knowledge.

  • Establish evaluative methods in clinical practice to determine intervention effectiveness
  • Utilize supervision as a mechanism for clinical practice evaluation to inform best practice knowledge
  • Evaluate clinical practice in an effort to strengthen knowledge, values, and skills
  • Utilize empirical literature that critically evaluates practice effectiveness

CSWE Data Reports

2017-2018

BSSW – Spring
MSW – Spring

2016-2017

BSSW – Spring
MSW – Spring

2015-2016

BSSW – Fall
BSSW – Spring
MSW – Fall
MSW – Spring
Dual MSW/MFT – Fall
Dual MSW/MFT – Spring

2014-2015

Instructor Reports

BSSW – Fall
BSSW – Spring
MSW – Fall
MSW – Spring

Student Reports

BSSW – Spring
MSW – Spring

2013-2014

Instructor Reports

BSSW – Fall
BSSW – Spring
MSW – Fall
MSW – Spring

Student Reports

BSSW – Spring
MSW – Spring