Program Assessment Data

The School of Social Work has developed, implemented, and looks to continually improve the assessment process to reflect the School’s goal of preparing individuals for ethically competent professional practice as social workers of advanced practice at the Master’s level and ethically competent beginning professional practice as social workers at the Baccalaureate level. The assessment effort provides data on the educational process as manifested in the attainment of educational outcomes (i.e., competencies) by students. Results of the assessment process are used to inform curriculum change and increase programmatic effectiveness.

The assessment efforts focus on the Field Instruction experience, as it serves in a capstone capacity for program students. The compilation of students’ educational knowledge and skills is tested in the field environment, allowing for direct assessment of their learning. The Field Instruction Evaluation, completed by field instructors at the end of field placement assignments, and the Student Self Efficacy Assessment, completed at the end of students’ final semester of field placement, are the key assessment measures.

The School identified the percentage of students performing at the level of “consistently demonstrates” (rating of ‘1’) or “generally demonstrates” (rating of ‘2’) as the benchmark for determining competency proficiency for the Field Instruction Evaluation. Ninety percent (90%) of MSW students must be rated at these performance levels in order for the competency benchmark to be attained. Eighty percent (80%) of BSSW students must be rated at these performance levels in order for the competency benchmark to be attained.

Similar to the explanation provided for the competency benchmark determination for the Field Instruction Evaluation, the percentage of students who reported a high level of confidence in being able to perform the practice behaviors associated with the competencies (“strongly agree” or “agree”) on the Self Efficacy Assessment was used to determine the competency benchmark. The benchmarks are set at 90% (MSW) and 80% (BSSW) of students reporting a high confidence level (“strongly agree” or “agree”).

 

Program Competencies for Assessment

  1. Social workers serve as representatives of the profession, its mission, and its core values. They know the profession’s history. Social Workers commit themselves to the profession’s enhancement and to their own professional conduct and growth.
  2. Apply social work ethical principles to guide professional practice Social workers have an obligation to conduct themselves ethically and to engage in ethical decision making. Social workers are knowledgeable about the value base of the profession, its ethical standards, and relevant law.
  3. Apply critical thinking to inform and communicate professional judgments Social workers are knowledgeable about the principles of logic, scientific inquiry, and reasoned discernment. They use critical thinking augmented by creativity and curiosity. Critical thinking also requires the synthesis and communication of relevant information.
  4. Engage diversity and difference in practice Social workers understand how diversity characterizes and shapes the human experience and is critical to the formation of identity. The dimensions of diversity are understood as the intersectionality of multiply factors including age, color, culture, disability, ethnicity, gender, gender identity and expression, immigration status, political ideology, race, religion, sex, and sexual orientation. Social workers appreciate that, as a consequence of difference, a person’s life experiences may include oppression, poverty, marginalization, and alienation as well as privilege, power, and acclaim.
  5. Advance human rights and social and economic justice Each person, regardless of position in society, has basic human rights, such as freedom, safety, privacy, an adequate standard of living, healthcare, and education. Social workers recognize the global interconnections of oppression and are knowledgeable about theories of justice and strategies to promote human and civil rights. Social work incorporates social justice practices in organizations, institutions, and society to ensure that these basic human rights are distributed equitably and without prejudice.
  6. Engage in research-informed practice and practice-informed research Social workers use practice experience to inform research, employ evidence-based interventions, evaluate their own practice, and use research findings to improve practice, policy and social service delivery. Social workers comprehend quantitative and qualitative research and understand scientific and ethical approaches to building knowledge.
  7. Apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment Social workers are knowledgeable about human behavior across the li9fe course; the range of social systems in which people live; and the ways social systems promote or deter people in maintaining or achieving healthy and well-being. Social workers apply theories and knowledge from the liberal arts to understand biological, social, cultural, psychological, and spiritual development.
  8. Engage in policy practice to advance social and economic well-being and to deliver effective social
  9. work services Social work practitioners understand that policy affects service delivery, and they actively engage in policy practice. Social workers know the history and current structures of social policies and services; the role of policy in service delivery; and the role of practice in policy development.
  10. Respond to contexts that shape practice Social workers are informed, resourceful, and proactive in responding to evolving organizational, community and societal contexts at all levels of practice. Social workers recognize that the context of practice is dynamic, and use knowledge and skill to respond proactively.
  11. Engage, assess, intervene, and evaluate with individuals, families, groups, organizations and communities Professional practice involves the dynamic and interactive processes of engagement, assessment, intervention, and evaluation at multiple levels. Social workers have the knowledge and skills to practice with individuals, families, groups, organizations and communities.

 

CSWE Data Reports

All reports are in PDF format

2016-2017

Instructor Reports

BSSW – Spring
MSW – Spring

2015-2016

Instructor Reports

BSSW – Fall
BSSW – Spring
MSW – Fall
MSW – Spring
Dual MSW/MFT – Fall
Dual MSW/MFT – Spring

2014-2015

Instructor Reports

BSSW – Fall
BSSW – Spring
MSW – Fall
MSW – Spring

Student Reports

BSSW – Spring
MSW – Spring

2013-2014

Instructor Reports

BSSW – Fall
BSSW – Spring
MSW – Fall
MSW – Spring

Student Reports

BSSW – Spring
MSW – Spring

2012-2013

Instructor Reports

BSSW – Fall
BSSW – Spring
MSW – Fall
MSW – Spring

Student Reports

BSSW – Spring
MSW – Spring

2011-2012

Instructor Reports

BSSW – Fall
BSSW – Spring
MSW – Fall
MSW – Spring

Student Reports

BSSW – Spring
MSW – Spring

2010-2011

Instructor Reports

BSSW – Fall
BSSW – Spring
MSW – Fall
MSW – Spring

Student Reports

BSSW – Spring
MSW – Spring

2009-2010

Instructor Reports

BSSW – Fall
BSSW – Spring
MSW – Fall
MSW – Spring

Student Reports

BSSW – Spring
MSW – Spring