Welcome

Fall 2022 Registration Information for New Students

We are thrilled that you’ve accepted our offer to join us as a new Syracuse University Falk College student! If you haven’t already done so, please visit our website for first-year and transfer students and begin your Becoming Orange Journey! Visiting and exploring this site will help make your transition to Syracuse University successful and smooth.

The information on this page is designed to help guide you through the registration process. Please read the information very carefully and feel free to contact us if you have additional questions that are not answered here.

For First-Year Students:

  • You will receive a personalized link to a Qualtrics survey through your syr.edu email address. It is very important that you promptly complete this survey. Once your survey is complete, Academic Counselors in the Falk College Office of Student Services will begin working on your Fall 2022 semester schedule.
  • You will be able to view and add additional courses to your schedule on August 1, 2022. You will receive emails to your syr.edu email address with further instructions on this process later this summer.
  • Falk College Office of Student Services can answer questions as you navigate the registration process. You can reach us at 315-443-3144 or via email at falkss@syr.edu.

For Transfer Students:

  • After matriculating, you will receive an email from your Falk College Recorder informing you about academic advising and registration.
  • Once you have received course advising, the department will then email Student Services and you will be enrolled in your courses.
  • For more information on transferring credits to fulfill the requirements of your SU degree, visit the Transfer Credits page under Academic Advising.
  • Transfer students can contact one of our student services counselors, with any questions, at (315) 443-3144 or via email at falkss@syr.edu. Please indicate you are a transfer student.

Please note: Check your SYR.EDU email address regularly or you will risk missing important Registration and Orientation information.

We look forward to welcoming you to campus soon!

Getting Ready

Getting Ready

Steps to take prior to completing your Qualtrics Survey

Step 1:

Activate your NET ID and Password

Step 2:

Take the Mathematics Placement Examination
All Falk College students must take the Mathematics Placement Examination.

Take your time on the exams. The placement test contains about 50 questions and should take about an hour, although it can take less time to complete. If you need to take a break you can save your progress and come back to it. Once you’ve completed all of the questions submit the exam and your placement will be generated.

Note: even if you do not plan to take a math course your first semester, you are required to take the math placement exam.

Step 3:

Take the Foreign Language Placement Exam
If you plan to take a Language in the fall, or if you are a Sport Analytics or Sport Management major, you will need to take the language Placement Examination.

Step 4:

Gather Information About AP, IB, SUPA and/or Transfer Credits.
Information on any Advanced Placement (AP), International Baccalaureate Course Equivalency (IB), Syracuse University Project Advance (SUPA), and Transfer credits that you have taken or anticipate taking over the summer will be relevant to your course selections.

Required Courses

Required Courses

Students typically take between 15 to 17 credits in the first semester comprised of required courses, liberal arts electives and general electives. Below you will find a list of required courses for students to take in their first semester based on each of our majors. We recommend enrolling in at least 15 credits to start, so you will take liberal arts courses and electives to add to your required courses. If you find that you need to increase or reduce your course load, you can discuss your concerns with your advisors.

If you have AP, IB, or College Transfer Credits that will meet any of the required courses listed below, you should receive an email from your Academic Advisor with alternate registration instructions. This email is due to arrive in the second half of July. If you do not receive an email by July 25th with alternate instructions or if you have any questions, please email falkss@syr.edu to request assistance.

To view required courses for your major simply click on the major below.

All Students

FYS 101 First Year Seminar (1 credit) – Students will explore the areas of Belonging, Interdependence, Health and Wellness, Development of Identity, Socialization, Prejudice, Discrimination, Bias, Stereotypes both within their FYS 101 section, in Syracuse University sponsored experiential activities, and in School/College level sponsored experiential activities.
WRT 105 Studio 1: Practices of Academic Writing (3 credits) – Study and practice of writing processes, including critical reading, collaboration, revision, editing, and the use of technologies. Focuses on the aims, strategies, and conventions of academic prose, especially analysis and argumentation.
MAT 121 Probability and Statistics for the Liberal Arts I (4 credits) – First in a two-course sequence. Teaches probability and statistics by focusing on data and reasoning. Includes displaying data, probability models and distributions.
NSD 225 Nutrition in Health (3 credits) – Nutrient requirements, functions, and sources. Interrelationships and application to food selection for healthy individuals. Weight control, sports nutrition and dietary supplements are discussed.

Falk Introductory Course in Major of Interest:

We recommend selecting an introductory level course that will be fitting to demonstrate interest in one of the Falk College majors. See suggestions below by major:

Food Studies
FST 102 Food Fights: Contemporary Food Issues (3 credits) – Introduction to key issues of the contemporary food system. Explores various social, political, economic, and environmental dimensions of food production, distribution, and consumption with a focus on the United States.
Health and Exercise Science
PHP 121 Personal and Social Health (3 credits) – Examines behavioral and social factors influencing the health of young adults. Note: a student cannot receive credit for both PHP 121 and PHP 219.
BIO 121 General Biology (4 credits) – Fundamental characteristics of life from the molecular level to the ecological community. General principles applicable to many forms of life. One lecture, one discussion period, and 4 hours of individualized instruction, including laboratory.
MAT 221 Elementary Probability and Statistics I (4 credits) – First of a two-course sequence. For students in fields that emphasize quantitative methods. Probability, design of experiments, sampling theory, introduction of computers for data management, evaluation of models, and estimation of parameters.
Human Development and Family Science
HSF 201 Family Development (3 credits) – Theoretical and functional approach to marital and family life with a developmental perspective. Issues related to marital and parental careers.
HFS 202 Development of Children (3 credits) – Principles and patterns of child development. Influence of biological and experiential factors. Extra-familial and intra-familial relationships as they influence child development. Fieldwork or equivalent required.
Nutrition or Nutrition Science
NSD 225 Nutrition in Health (3 credits) – Nutrient requirements, functions, and sources. Interrelationships and application to food selection for healthy individuals. Weight control, sports nutrition and dietary supplements are discussed.
PSY 205 Foundations of Human Behavior (3 credits) – Fundamental principles of mental life and human behavior. Significance of psychology in human relationships and self-understanding.
BIO 121 General Biology I (4 credits) – First course in a survey of biological concepts ranging from the molecular level to global ecology. Units include the nature of science, life chemistry, cell structure and function, photosynthesis and respiration, genetics, and evolution.
Public Health
PHP 121 Personal and Social Health (3 credits) – Examines behavioral and social factors influencing the health of young adults. Note: a student cannot receive credit for both PHP 121 and PHP 219.
PHP 219 Human Health and Disease (3 credits) – Examines major chronic conditions and other preventable illness with a primary focus on public health’s goals related to disease prevention. For registration purposes, you should select, Section M002/Course Number 18447 as this section is specifically reserved for students in your major.
Social Work
HFS 202 Development of Children (3 credits) – Principles and patterns of child development. Influence of biological and experiential factors. Extra-familial and intra-familial relationships as they influence child development. Fieldwork or equivalent required.
SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology (3 credits) – Principal concepts, methods, and findings in sociology. Societal structures, processes, institutions, and social roles from both macro- and microanalytic human behavior perspectives.
SOC 102 Social Problems (3 credits) – Application of sociological theory and methods to identification, description, and analysis of contemporary social problems. Critique and analysis of alternative strategies for social change.
PSY 205 Foundations of Human Behavior (3 credits) – Fundamental principles of mental life and human behavior. Significance of psychology in human relationships and self-understanding.
Sport Analytics
ECN 101 Introductory Microeconomics (3 credits) – Introduction to microeconomics. Consumer demand, theory of production, markets and prices, social welfare, and related topics. Credit is given for either ECN 101, 102 or ECN 203.
ECN 102 Introductory Macroeconomics (3 credits) – Introduction to macroeconomics. Gross domestic product, unemployment, money, inflation, and related topics. Credit is given for either ECN 102 or ECN 203. Credit cannot be given for ECN 102 after completing ECN 302.
MAT 221 Elementary Probability and Statistics I (4 credits) – First of a two-course sequence. For students in fields that emphasize quantitative methods. Probability, design of experiments, sampling theory, introduction of computers for data management, evaluation of models, and estimation of parameters.
Sport Management
ECN 101 Introductory Microeconomics (3 credits) – Introduction to microeconomics. Consumer demand, theory of production, markets and prices, social welfare, and related topics. Credit is given for either ECN 101, 102 or ECN 203.
ECN 102 Introductory Macroeconomics (3 credits) – Introduction to macroeconomics. Gross domestic product, unemployment, money, inflation, and related topics. Credit is given for either ECN 102 or ECN 203. Credit cannot be given for ECN 102 after completing ECN 302.
CRS 325 Presentational Speaking (3 credits) – Conceptual and practical dimensions of formal presentations in organizational settings. Analysis, adaptation, strategic arrangement and development of ideas, verbal and nonverbal presentational skills.
MAT 221 Elementary Probability and Statistics I (4 credits) – First of a two-course sequence. For students in fields that emphasize quantitative methods. Probability, design of experiments, sampling theory, introduction of computers for data management, evaluation of models, and estimation of parameters.
EXE 195 Introduction to Exercise Science (3 credits) – Topics in exercise science including exercise physiology, mechanics of human motion, motor behavior, sports psychology
BIO 121 General Biology (4 credits) – Fundamental characteristics of life from the molecular level to the ecological community. General principles applicable to many forms of life. One lecture, one discussion period, and 4 hours of individualized instruction, including laboratory.
CHE 106
(Pre-clinical
Students only)
General Chemistry Lecture (3 credits) – Fundamental principles and laws underlying chemical action, states of matter, atomic and molecular structure, chemical bonding, stoichiometry, properties of solutions, chemical equilibrium, and introductory thermodynamics. Descriptive chemistry in relation to theoretical principles.
CHE 107
(Pre-clinical
Students only)
General Chemistry Laboratory (1 credit) – Experimental study of basic principles and techniques of chemistry. States of matter, determination of formulas and molecular weights, simple volumetric and gravimetric analysis, heats of reaction. Equilibrium, rates of reactions, and qualitative analysis.
PSY 205 Foundations of Human Behavior (3 credits) – Fundamental principles of mental life and human behavior. Significance of psychology in human relationships and self-understanding.
Math based on placement test (non-clinical students only)
FST 102 Food Fights: Contemporary Food Issues (3 credits) – Introduction to key issues of the contemporary food system. Explores various social, political, economic, and environmental dimensions of food production, distribution, and consumption with a focus on the United States.
NSD 114 Food Safety and Quality Assurance (2 credits) – Theory and practice of food safety and quality assurance in commercial food service operations. Origins and prevention of food-borne illness. Development and management of HACCP-based food safety systems.
NSD 225 Nutrition in Health (3 credits) – Nutrient requirements, functions, and sources. Interrelationships and application to food selection for healthy individuals. Weight control, sports nutrition and dietary supplements are discussed.
Math based on placement test
HFS 202 Development of Children (3 credits) – Principles and patterns of child development. Influence of biological and experiential factors. Extra-familial and intra-familial relationships as they influence child development. Fieldwork or equivalent required.
HFS 255 Interpersonal Competence (3 credits) – Interpersonal problem-solving skills. Helping theories appropriate to human development settings. Skills and behaviors that apply theory to practice setting.
NSD 225 Nutrition in Health (3 credits) – Nutrient requirements, functions, and sources. Interrelationships and application to food selection for healthy individuals. Weight control, sports nutrition and dietary supplements are discussed.

Mathematics Requirement:

(one of the following based on placement test)

MAT 121 Probability and Statistics for the Liberal Arts I (4 credits) – First in a two-course sequence. Teaches probability and statistics by focusing on data and reasoning. Includes displaying data, probability models and distributions.
MAT 194 Precalculus (4 credits) – Polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions. Analytical trigonometry and trigonometric functions.
MAT 221 Elementary Probability and Statistics I (4 credits) – First of a two-course sequence. For students in fields that emphasize quantitative methods. Probability, design of experiments, sampling theory, introduction of computers for data management, evaluation of models, and estimation of parameters.
MAT 285 Life Sciences Calculus I (3 credits) – Functions and their graphs, derivatives and their applications, differentiation techniques, the exponential and logarithm functions, multivariable differential calculus including constrained optimization.
MAT 295 Calculus I (4 credits) – Analytic geometry, limits, derivatives, maxima-minima, related rates, graphs, differentials, exponential and logarithmic functions, mean-value theorem, L’Hospital’s rule, integration.
BIO 121 General Biology (4 credits) – Fundamental characteristics of life from the molecular level to the ecological community. General principles applicable to many forms of life. One lecture, one discussion period, and 4 hours of individualized instruction, including laboratory.
CHE 106 General Chemistry Lecture (3 credits) – Fundamental principles and laws underlying chemical action, states of matter, atomic and molecular structure, chemical bonding, stoichiometry, properties of solutions, chemical equilibrium, and introductory thermodynamics. Descriptive chemistry in relation to theoretical principles.
CHE 107 General Chemistry Laboratory (1 credit) – Experimental study of basic principles and techniques of chemistry. States of matter, determination of formulas and molecular weights, simple volumetric and gravimetric analysis, heats of reaction. Equilibrium, rates of reactions, and qualitative analysis.
NSD 225 Nutrition in Health (3 credits) – Nutrient requirements, functions, and sources. Interrelationships and application to food selection for healthy individuals.
PHP 219 Human Health and Disease (3 credits) – Examines major chronic conditions and other preventable illness with a primary focus on public health’s goals related to disease prevention.

Mathematics Requirement:

Pre-clinical students will not take math in the first semester. Non-clinical students will be placed in one of the following based on placement exam.

MAT 121 Probability and Statistics for the Liberal Arts I (4 credits) – First in a two-course sequence. Teaches probability and statistics by focusing on data and reasoning. Includes displaying data, probability models and distributions.
– OR –
MAT 221 Elementary Probability and Statistics I (4 credits) -First of a two-course sequence. For students in fields that emphasize quantitative methods. Probability, design of experiments, sampling theory, introduction of computers for data management, evaluation of models, and estimation of parameters.

Natural Science Requirement:

Students pursuing a pre-clinical health track (medicine, nursing, occupational therapy, pharmacy, physician assistant, physical therapy, or others) must register for BIO 121 and CHE106/CHE 107. All other students must choose one course from the following:

BIO 121 General Biology I (4 credits) – First course in a survey of biological concepts ranging from the molecular level to global ecology. Units include the nature of science, life chemistry, cell structure and function, photosynthesis and respiration, genetics, and evolution.
EAR 105 Earth Science (3 credits) – Processes that shape Earth and affect humans: Earth’s structure; plate tectonics; geologic time; and surficial processes. Students needing laboratory credit must register for EAR 104. Students may not receive credit for EAR 105 and 110.
EAR 111 Climate Change Past and Present (3 credits) – Introduction to the science of climate change from the geological record of the last century. Major drivers of global climate, measuring change, and forecasting future climate. Role of human activities in present climate.
EAR 117 Oceanography (3 credits) – A comprehensive introduction to the geology, physics, chemistry, and biology of the world ocean and its impact on global climate and environmental concerns.
EAR 205 Water and Our Environment (3 credits) – Investigates origin, occurrence, chemistry and hydrology of water on earth. Includes climate change, contamination and water supply issues within context of water sustainability.
EAR 225 Volcanoes and Earthquakes (3 credits) – Examination of the geologic nature of volcanoes and earthquakes as they are related to plate tectonic activity in the Earth. Discussion of related societal hazards
GEO 155 The Natural Environment (3 credits) – Patterns of the physical phenomena at and near the surface of the earth. Surface configuration, climate, vegetation, and soil and their areal interrelationships.
GEO 215 Global Environmental Change (3 credits) – Focusing on physical properties and patterns of environmental change, changes occurring as a result of human activities, and the social consequences of environmental change.
PSY 205 Foundations of Human Behavior (3 credits) – Fundamental principles of mental life and human behavior. Significance of psychology in human relationships and self-understanding.
SWK 115 Introduction to Social Work (3 credits) – Roles social workers assume in professional practice; social context within which practice occurs; major fields of practice; field trips to local agencies.
NSD 225 Nutrition in Health (3 credits) – Nutrient requirements, functions, and sources. Interrelationships and application to food selection for healthy individuals. Weight control, sports nutrition and dietary supplements are discussed.

Mathematics Requirement:

MAT 121 Probability and Statistics for the Liberal Arts I (4 credits) – First in a two-course sequence. Teaches probability and statistics by focusing on data and reasoning. Includes displaying data, probability models and distributions.
– OR –
MAT 221 Elementary Probability and Statistics I (4 credits) – First of a two-course sequence. For students in fields that emphasize quantitative methods. Probability, design of experiments, sampling theory, introduction of computers for data management, evaluation of models, and estimation of parameters.
SPM 295 Research Methodology (3 credits) – Introduction to the basic elements of sport research with an emphasis on APA writing style. When registering for this course, select Section M003/Course Number 18409 or Section M004/Course Number 18456 as these sections are specifically reserved for students in your major.
ECN 101 Introductory Microeconomics (3 credits) – Introduction to microeconomics. Consumer demand, theory of production, markets and prices, social welfare, and related topics. Credit is given for either ECN 101, 102 or ECN 203.
Foreign Language based on placement test.

Math based on placement test.

SPM 205 Principles of Sport Management (3 credits) – Overview of the sport industry through examination of problems and issues faced by contemporary sport managers. Unique characteristics of sport and resulting social and ethical responsibilities of sport managers are discussed.
ECN 101 Introductory Microeconomics (3 credits) – Introduction to microeconomics. Consumer demand, theory of production, markets and prices, social welfare, and related topics.Credit cannot be given for ECN 101 after completing ECN 301 or ECN 311.
– OR –
ECN 102 Introductory Macroeconomics (3 credits) – Introduction to macroeconomics. Gross domestic product, unemployment, money, inflation, and related topics. Credit is given for either ECN 102 or ECN 203. Credit cannot be given for ECN 102 after completing ECN 302.
MAT 221 Elementary Probability and Statistics I (4 credits) – First of a two-course sequence. For students in fields that emphasize quantitative methods. Probability, design of experiments, sampling theory, introduction of computers for data management, evaluation of models, and estimation of parameters.
– OR –
Language based on placement test.

Special Categories

Instructions for Special Categories

Learning Communities

If you have applied to participate in a Learning Community, it may have one or more required courses. You will be enrolled in these classes automatically.

Renée Crown University Honors Program

If you have been admitted to the Renée Crown University Honors Program, please refer to Honors Program First Year Enrollment site for questions about requirements and course selection for the fall semester. If you have questions about selecting Honors courses, you can contact an Honors advisor at (315) 443-2759 or honors@syr.edu.

Syracuse University Marching Band (SUMB) “The Pride of the Orange.”

If you are interested in participating in “The Pride of the Orange,” Syracuse University Marching Band, please contact the band office at (315) 443-2194 or email Fran Moore at fmmoore@syr.edu. If you have informed the band office of your interest in the SUMB, then no other action is needed. All members are required to attend band camp the week before classes begin. Rehearsals averaging six hours per week (three evenings, two hours each) occur during the fall semester with additional rehearsals during game week. You are required to register for Marching Band (ENI 510) for one credit. If you are at a maximum credit load, your college will contact the band office for consent.

Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC)

The Army ROTC meets for two academic hours, two leadership lab hours and three physical fitness hours each week, and the Air Force meets for three academic and three physical fitness hours each week. Army ROTC program consists of a combination of credit and non-credit courses. Air Force ROTC courses can be taken for credit or noncredit. Army ROTC offers merit-based scholarships that pay for full tuition and fees at Syracuse, as well as monthly stipends. Air Force ROTC also offers merit-based scholarships that pay for full or partial tuition and fees and gives each recipient a monthly stipend. In addition, all Army and Air Force ROTC scholarship winners receive an annual $9,500, a full Room & Board Leadership Award, from the University that can be applied to their room and board fees. For more information please check the Airforce ROTC website and Army ROTC website.

If you are participating in ROTC please make sure to indicate this on your Qualtrics survey.

College Credits

If you expect to receive Advanced Placement examination credit, Syracuse University Project Advance credit, or transfer credit make sure to include this on your Qualtrics survey. If you have not yet submitted your transfer credit please send directly to:

David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics
Syracuse University
Office of the Recorders
330 Barclay Hall,
Syracuse, New York 13244

Or email falkss@syr.edu.

Information on AP, IB and CLEP exam scores.
Information on transferring credits to fulfill the requirements of your SU degree.

What's Next

What’s Next

What happens after you submit your Qualtrics survey?

  • Starting in June and July 2022- academic counselors in Falk College begin to create student schedules based on the information provided to us in the survey.
  • August 1-5 2022 – new students will have the ability to add remaining courses to complete their schedules.
  • August 25, 2022 – Move in for first year students begins. Welcome to SU!
  • August 29, 2022– First day of class.

Follow us on Facebook to keep up to date with all the latest news from Falk.

FAQs

Frequently Asked Questions

I’m completing the Qualtrics survey and some of the links don’t work, how do I open them?

In order for the pages to function, you will need to turn off your pop-up blocker. To learn how to turn off the pop-up blocker for your browser visit the following links:

Internet Explorer
Firefox
Safari

Do I have to take the placement exams, if I don’t plan on taking a math or foreign language my first semester?

While we do require first-year students to take the math placement exam before they arrive on campus, the foreign language is optional for many Falk students and required only if you plan on taking a language course in the fall or are a Sport Analytics or Sport Management major.

Can language placement exams be taken online?

Yes! Our language placement exams can be taken online via MySlice Please refer to the New Student Course Enrollment page for more information.

Do I need to take a language course for my major?

The only majors in Falk that requires a foreign language are Sport Analytics and Sport Management. Otherwise, languages can be used to complete liberal arts requirements.

Do I need to take math my first semester?

For some majors it is strongly recommended that you take a math early. If you have concerns about taking a math course (or any other type of course), please make a note on your Qualtrics survey.

How many credits do most students take?

The average credit load is between 15 and 17 credits, however various circumstances may require a student to consider taking fewer and in rare cases more than the average load.

I want to be a pre-med student, what do I need to do?

Since the pre-health program requires in-depth work in the sciences, it is helpful for us to know this in advance. Please make a note on your Qualtrics survey if you plan to follow a pre-med track. If you have any additional questions you may contact us at (315) 443-3144 or falkss@syr.edu.

If I took courses through SU Project Advance (SUPA) do I need to send a transcript to SU?

No, if the courses and credit were offered through SU, we have a record of those courses. If you have or plan to receive college credit through a college or university other than SU, you should send transcripts to Falk College Student Services.

I want to take a course at home this summer to transfer into Syracuse, is there anything I need to consider?

Before registering for a course at any other institution you should make sure the class will be accepted to count towards your program here at SU. The process for transferring credits into Falk College can be found on the Falk College Transfer Credits page. If you have any questions, don’t hesitate to contact us at 315-443-3144 or falkss@syr.edu.

What is the address to send transcripts?

David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics
Syracuse University
Office of the Recorders
330 Barclay Hall,
Syracuse, New York 13244

Or email falkss@syr.edu.

How do I arrange accommodations for my physical/learning disability?

You can contact the The Center for Disability Resources (CDR) at (315) 443-4498.

What type of computer should I bring to campus?

You can refer to the help page from SU Information Technology and Services for more information on computing.

What else do I need to complete before I get to campus in August?

Check out the New Student Checklist to make sure you are completing everything before you arrive.

Why am I only registered for a few courses?

Academic advisors in Falk Student services will begin to enroll students in required courses starting in June and July. You will then complete the rest of your schedule during an online registration process the week of August 1-5. This process is designed to give students the opportunity to learn how to use the Syracuse University registration system and have the ability to select some courses, based on recommendations from advisors.

How do I know which classes I should add to my schedule in August?

You will receive email communications to your syr.edu email address from Falk college advising staff later in the summer. In these communications you will receive further instructions about which courses you should enroll in for the fall semester and about how to do so.